Call for Papers

OPEN CALLS

Call for Papers for Thematic Issue on

THE CLASH OF CIVILIZATIONS IN THE 21ST CENTURY

Editors: Ronald J. Pohoryles & Saša Božić

SUBMISSION DEADLINE: 30 April 2016

With some exceptions the development in the Arab world after the Arab Spring and its impact on Europe and beyond is obviously related to warfare and violence. This has led to serious consequences for the social sciences and the current debate on the issue at hand. One of the most important consequences was the reemergence of Huntington’s ideas in the academic discourse and in the public debate. His conclusions are, in a nutshell, that a) the Western civilization is superior to all other civilizations, and b) the Western civilization is threatened by the conflict between Christianity and Islam. The clash of civilizations occurs at the domestic level (‘fault line conflicts’), or between nation states or groups of the later (‘core state conflicts’).

These theses are heavily contested, as both his notion of ‘civilization’ and the different level of ‘inclination to violence’ are not accepted within the mainstream of the social science communities. Furthermore, in a normative perspective some scholars argue that civilization and violence are mutually exclusive: for example, both Norbert Elias and Steven Pinker see the apparent gradual world-wide decrease of violence as the result of long term civilizing processes. By contrast, other social scientists see violence as the constitutive phenomenon of civilization: for example, Michael Mann and Charles Tilly argue that the modern state is a product of economic, ideological and political power, hence a result of warfare and military might.

This special issue will tackle the most challenging topic in the current situation from a theoretical perspective. Social science scholars from all disciplines are invited to contribute to the issue. it will comprise the most important contribution of the annual conference of the Croatian Sociological Association as well.

Please note: INNOVATION uses the ScholarOne system for electronic submission. No manuscript should be sent directly to the editors of the journal. Your contribution should be submitted directly in the system (http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/ciej).

All submissions will undergo double-blind peer review. Authors interested in contributing to this special issue should submit their paper online at the following address: URL: http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/ciej?URL_MASK=m8sBk7XTXhXh3JDq8Qym.

Before submitting, authors should ensure that they follow the ‘Instructions for authors’, as outlined on the website of Innovation: the European Journal of Social Research: http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=ciej20&page=instructions

Article length can range between 6,000 to 10,000 words for original research and debate articles and 2,000 to 4,000 words for research notes.
If you have any queries, please get in touch with: r.pohoryles@iccr-foundation.org
Articles from Innovation – The European Journal of Social Science Research are summarized in Sociological Abstracts; Linguistics and Language Behavior Abstracts; Geo Abstracts; Ebsco CD Rom Database and Universal Microfilms Inc; CD Rom Database; Multicultural Education Abstracts; International Political Science Abstracts; Politics and Policy; Research Alert; Applied Social Sciences Index and Abstracts; Caredata Abstracts; International Bibliography of the Social Sciences; Thompson Scientific.

PREVIOUS CALLS

Call for Papers for Thematic Issue on

‘SCIENCE ETHICS- (INTER-) DISCIPLINARY PERSPECTIVES’

Editors: Ronald J. Pohoryles, Alice BM Vadrot, and Thomas Pfister

SUBMISSION DEADLINE: 30 May 2014

In May 2013, UNESCO hosted an interdisciplinary expert conference on Emerging Ethical Issues in Science and Technology under the aegis of the of the 8th Ordinary Session of the World Commission on the Ethics of Scientific Knowledge and Technology (COMEST). COMEST was set up by UNESCO in 1993 to reflect on the many different aspects of science ethics and to formulate ethical principles which could provide decision-makers with criteria extending beyond purely economic considerations. Whilst everybody would agree in principle that such an endeavour is important, there is not yet enough clarity about what this might mean in practice and what different challenges this might pose to different disciplines against the background of a globalizing world. Since its foundation in 1986, INNOVATION-The European Journal of Social Science Research has been concerned with different aspects of scientific knowledge production and use in different areas of innovation and social contexts. We have published special issues to contribute to related debates in different areas, such as Converging Science and Technologies: Research Trajectories and Institutional Settings in 2007, E-Inclusion and E-Government- Challenges and Policies in 2008, Sociology and Interdisciplinarity in 2009, Steering Biomedicine: Regulatory Dynamics of Therapeutic Technologies in the European Union in 2012, and Privacy and Technology in 2013. Assuming that ‘innovation is not just a technical and economic problem’ (Pohoryles 1988; Vadrot 2011), but enmeshed in social acceptance and politico-institutional change, it is inevitably linked to science ethics.

Against this background, this special issue aims at providing a platform for extending the debate on science ethics within the social science communities in a more systematic and overarching way. The aim is to shed light on the many different facets of science ethics alongside different scientific disciplines, methods and practices. Ethical issues in science cover a broad range of topics besides the production, application and use of scientific knowledge. Whether and how to utilize nuclear power, if and under which conditions to expand research on stem cells, how to cope with brain-enhancing technologies, by what means to justify full CCTV coverage of public spaces and how to deal with robotics for health care- all these examples show that the production, application and use of scientific knowledge require decisions to be made against the background of the values and ethical principles on which the organization of societies is based and justified and against the background of the desire for human well-being. In addition to these important ethical and political questions posed by science and technology to contemporary societies, more specific ethical institutions, rules and codes specify the conditions of scientific integrity; define violations, their consequences as well as the institutions responsible for governing research ethics within the academic community. The question of how to govern scientific knowledge within the margins of scientific freedom and social responsibility is a tricky one, particularly because the way in which knowledge might impact on the many different aspects of human life and the environments within which we live often remains unpredictable und blurred.

In the era of post-normal science, scientists are faced with the imperatives to reflect on the potential impact and risk of their ‘knowledge products’ and to monitor their own research practice in terms of reliability, saliency and legitimacy. In spite of a significant increase in technology assessments, monitoring activities, modelling techniques and evaluation schemes, societal and political choices need to be made beyond the scale of objective metrics. Science ethics has become an important strand of research in different disciplines of social science, but no systematic overview currently exists on the contribution of the social sciences to science ethics, and some important ethical issues within social science research still remain under-represented. Examples include the role of the social media as a research object, methodology and tool for increasing the usability and quality of citizen science in the development of ‘big data’, but also inconsistencies in the ethical dimension of social science research in the clinic.
In order to explore the different dimensions and attributes of science ethics as well as its relationship to social science research, this call seeks papers addressing, for example, the following issues from theoretical and/or empirical perspectives:

  • Social Science perspectives on ethical implications of S & T, for example, in the following areas:
    • Health, medicine, psychiatry, and psychology, including new and emerging medical technologies, (bio-) medical research and clinical testing.
    • Environmental justice, natural resource management, biodiversity and climate change, including technological issues and field research practices.
    • Architecture, land planning, urban planning but also engineering as well as other disciplines and techniques that actively intervene in the material dimension of social order.
  • Ethical issues in the social sciences, relating to research practices, participatory approaches, data storage, recording techniques, and research in sensitive environments (e.g. clinical settings, ministries). We are particularly interested in papers reflecting on the gaps and needs in the development of ethical principles for social science research at the interface between technology and society.
  • Ethical issues relating to the use ICT in scientific research, with particular emphasis on social media, computer games, GPS data, and smart phones. Contributions are welcome shedding light on the ethical dimensions of the use of ICT in social science research or on social science perspectives on the use of ICT and the technologies and methods mentioned above in other scientific disciplines.
  • Institutions of science and higher education as ‘ethical’ spaces, relating to the teaching, monitoring, enforcing, and administration of ethics in science and higher education; the role of research ethics in this more specific sense with regard to the reception and legitimacy of science in the public.

 

Please note: INNOVATION uses the ScholarOne system for electronic submission. No manuscript should be sent directly to the editors of the journal. Your contribution should be submitted directly in the system (http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/ciej).

All submissions will undergo double-blind peer review. Authors interested in contributing to this special issue should submit their paper online at the following address: URL: http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/ciej?URL_MASK=m8sBk7XTXhXh3JDq8Qym.

Before submitting, authors should ensure that they follow the ‘Instructions for authors’, as outlined on the website of Innovation: the European Journal of Social Research: http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=ciej20&page=instructions

Article length can range between 6,000 to 10,000 words for original research and debate articles and 2,000 to 4,000 words for research notes.
If you have any queries, please get in touch with: vadrot@iccr-foundation.org
Articles from Innovation – The European Journal of Social Science Research are summarized in Sociological Abstracts; Linguistics and Language Behavior Abstracts; Geo Abstracts; Ebsco CD Rom Database and Universal Microfilms Inc; CD Rom Database; Multicultural Education Abstracts; International Political Science Abstracts; Politics and Policy; Research Alert; Applied Social Sciences Index and Abstracts; Caredata Abstracts; International Bibliography of the Social Sciences; Thompson Scientific.

Call for Papers for Thematic Issue on

RE-ASSESSING EXPERTISE AND EXPERT KNOWLEDGE’

Guest editors Thomas Pfister (Zeppelin University) and Anna Horvath (EACEA)

SUBMISSION DEADLINE: Mai 30, 2013

Please note: INNOVATION uses the ScholarOne system for electronic submission. No manuscript should be sent directly to the editors of the journal. Your contribution should be submitted directly in the system (http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/ciej).

(Scientific) experts and expert knowledge are essential elements of contemporary governance and their importance seems to be increasing. However, who is an expert, what counts as reliable expert knowledge, and how it should be fed into political processes is far from self-evident. Although linear theories of a “speaking truth to power” kind are still prevalent throughout all parts of society (including many scientists) they cannot be upheld any longer. Rather, who is an expert is constructed in interaction with certain audiences and in the context of certain historical conditions, most importantly, the institutions of higher education and science. Crucially, such negotiations always involve an element of boundary work, where the distinction between the expert and the non-expert is drawn and contested.

Also the contents of expert knowledge are the result of complex (sociotechnical) interactions among expert communities and their audiences, stakeholders, sponsors, regulators, the media and more. At the same time, demand for systematic information and expert knowledge is increasingly essential for the assessment of risks, development of political strategies, legitimation of political action as well as for public debate at large. Closely related, while states have always relied on “regulatory science” (Jasanoff) we are witnessing a proliferation of new institutional spaces and instruments where expert knowledge is produced or mobilised for political purposes.

Within states, regulatory agencies, expert committees, and various forms of expert policy advice have become regular and central elements of the political landscape. Moreover, such new spaces are particularly visible in the international sphere. For example, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has probably received most of the attention (and criticism) as a hybrid institution linking science and politics in completely new ways.

In short, the essential and increasing entanglement of experts and expert knowledge in political processes do not lead to more objective and less contested politics but simply stipulate a politics of expertise. In order to explore the dimensions and attributes of this aspect of politics as well as its relationship with other dimensions of politics, science, and society this call seeks papers addressing, for example, the following issues from theoretical or empirical perspectives:

  • The construction of expertise: who counts as an expert? How is expert knowledge identified? What different kinds of expertise are there? How are the boundaries between ‘experts’ and ‘non-experts’ defined and potentially blurred? What kind of expertise might be needed for what problem?
  • How is expert knowledge actually produced? How does it circulate beyond expert communities? How is it fed into specific political processes?
  • How do actors not in possession of ‘traditional’ attributes of expertise (such as academic training, employment in a university or research institute) engage in the politics of expertise? How do they mobilise experts and expert knowledge to further their political projects? Under which conditions can they themselves produce expert knowledge?
  • What is the relationship between experts, political actors, and publics? How can expert knowledge and democratic self-government be integrated in one framework?

All submissions will undergo double-blind peer review. Authors interested in contributing to this special issue should submit their paper online at the following URL: http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/ciej?URL_MASK=m8sBk7XTXhXh3JDq8Qym.

Before submitting, authors should ensure that they follow the ‘Instructions for authors’ as outlined on the website of Innovation: the European Journal for Social Research: http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=ciej20&page=instructions

Article length can range between 6,000 to 10,000 words for original research and debate articles and 2,000 to 4,000 for research notes.

For further questions, please get in touch with Thomas Pfister: Thomas.pfister@zu.de

Articles from Innovation – The European Journal of Social Science Research are abstracted in Sociological Abstracts; Linguistics and Language Behavior Abstracts; Geo Abstracts; Ebsco CD Rom Database and Universal Microfilms Inc; CD Rom Database; MulticulturalEducation Abstracts; International Political Science Abstracts; Politics and Policy; Research Alert; Applied Social Sciences Index and Abstracts; Caredata Abstracts; International Bibliography of the Social Sciences; Thompson Scientific